Daily Archives: September 8, 2009

5 Million Jobs Short

jobsgapsaugust

While the promoting  the stimulus plan the Obama administration promised it would create 2.5 million jobs by the end of 2010. Later the Obama administration revised the number to 4 million new jobs. This makes the target number 138.6 million employed if the plan performs as advertised.

In August another 216,000 jobs were lost , lowering total U.S. employment to 131.2 million. We are still going the wrong direction leading most to beleve the stimulus is not working.

Unemployment is now at 9.7% and threatening to continue its’ climb. What happened to those shovel ready projects that were going to put [eople to work right away. Even more concerning is if the administration is successful in its’ efforts to put through Tax and Cap, Health Care Reform and tax increases more jobs will be lost.

It is time for a new plan. Since all the money has not been spent and the results are so poor, maybe it is time to return the unspent money to the Treasury, pay down the debt and try something different.

Maybe we should consider business tax cuts and tax credits for capital investment. No good will come from more government regulation and involvement in the markets.  

 

 Here are some other stats:

National Tracking: Economy

Rate Economy – Poor 56%
Economy Getting Worse 44%
RR Employment Index 63.9
Hiring 15%
Laying Off 28%
Worried about Losing Job 29%
The US is on the Wrong Track 63%

Hollywood Leftists on Parade…..

Once again the “Hollywood Left” jumps aboard the socialist band wagon. 

Here is a medley of news stories from the last few days that illustrates the political leanings of the bulk of the Hollywood elite. These stories show how they use their media to twist public perception of political events from around the world to further their agenda. 

Story #1 Hugo Chavez receives a movie star welcome

 VENICE, Italy (AP) – Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez received a movie star welcome Monday at the Venice Film Festival, where he walked the red carpet with director Oliver Stone for the premiere of the documentary “South of the Border.”

Hundreds of admirers, some chanting “president, president,” gathered outside of the Casino for the leader’s arrival. A few held up Venezuelan flags and a banner in Spanish that read “Welcome, president.”

Chavez threw a flower into the crowd and touched his heart, and at one point took a photographer’s camera to snap a picture himself. Security outside the Casino was tightened in advance of his arrival with military police checking bags.

Chavez praised Stone’s work for depicting what he said were improvements made across Latin America.

“Rebirth is happening in Latin America, and Stone went to look for it and he found it,” Chavez told reporters. “With his cameras and his genius, he’s captured a good part of that rebirth.”

Stone says “South of the Border” is meant to illustrate “the sweeping changes” in South America in recent years as a direct counterpoint to what some say is Chavez’s depiction as a dictator by U.S. and European media.

Stone spent extensive time with Chavez for the 75-minute documentary, which is premiering at the Venice Film Festival on Monday, and also interviewed the leaders of Argentina, Brazil, Ecuador, Bolivia, Cuba and Chavez threw a flower into the crowd and touched his heart, and at one point took a photographer’s camera to snap a picture himself. Security outside the Casino was tightened in advance of his arrival with military police checking bags.

“He’s a guy you should meet and get to know. … He’s the star of the movie,” Stone said in an interview before the premiere.

Stone said he wanted to illustrate changes that put leaders in many South American countries in power who represent the majority of their populations, a movement started with Chavez. He cited Bolivian President Evo Morales, the first Indian to be elected president, and Brazil’s Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, a well-known trade unionist.

“If you look now, there are seven presidents, eight countries with Chile that are really moving away from the Washington consensus control,” Stone said. “But in America, they don’t get that story.”

Stone was invited to Venezuela to meet Chavez for the first time during the Venezuelan leader’s aborted rescue mission of Colombian hostages held by FARC rebels. The mission was aborted, but Stone said the Chavez he met was different than some U.S. media depictions.

He returned in January to interview Chavez, and continued on to four other countries to interview Chavez’s allies, with Cuban and Ecuadorean leaders joining him in Paraguay.

Stone is best known for his dramas, but he also has made four documentaries, including “Comandante,” the 2003 documentary based on a meeting with Cuban leader Fidel Castro, which the director says in many ways led him to Chavez.

“I used the real man,” Stone said. “I hope you realize how dynamic he is in the movie. What I like about the film is you see how sincere he is on camera. You don’t see a guy who is a phony. He’s not a dictator.”

Stone had said he spent “several hours here and there” with Chavez. The movie shows him at Chavez’s enormous desk and visiting the president’s childhood home, where he rides into the frame on a child’s bicycle, which breaks under his weight. He immediately offers to pay for it. Footage also shows Chavez driving his own vehicle and stopping to greet supporters.

Stone said he didn’t see it necessary to present the opposition’s case in his film.

Stone said he wanted to illustrate changes that put leaders in many South American countries in power who represent the majority of their populations, a movement started with Chavez. He cited Bolivian President Evo Morales, the first Indian to be elected president, and Brazil’s Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, a well-known trade unionist.

“If you look now, there are seven presidents, eight countries with Chile  that are really moving away from the Washington consensus control,” Stone said. “But in America, they don’t get that story.”

Stone was invited to Venezuela to meet Chavez for the first time during the Venezuelan leader’s aborted rescue mission of Colombian hostages held by FARC rebels. The mission was aborted, but Stone said the Chavez he met was different than some U.S. media depictions.

He returned in January to interview Chavez, and continued on to four other countries to interview Chavez’s allies, with Cuban and Ecuadorean leaders joining him in Paraguay.

Stone is best known for his dramas, but he also has made four documentaries, including “Comandante,” the 2003 documentary based on a meeting with Cuban leader Fidel Castro, which the director says in many ways led him to Chavez.

“I used the real man,” Stone said. “I hope you realize how dynamic he is in the movie. What I like about the film is you see how sincere he is on camera. You don’t see a guy who is a phony. He’s not a dictator.”

Stone had said he spent “several hours here and there” with Chavez. The movie shows him at Chavez’s enormous desk and visiting the president’s childhood home, where he rides into the frame on a child’s bicycle, which breaks under his weight. He immediately offers to pay for it. Footage also shows Chavez driving his own vehicle and stopping to greet supporters.

Stone said he didn’t see it necessary to present the opposition’s case in his film.

 Full story, videos and pictures at:  http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=D9AIKJ582&show_article=1

Story #2: Using his “red carpet” moment to his advantage Chavez praises Obama and claims, “we can talk”.

VENICE (Reuters) – Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, a fierce critic of U.S. foreign policy who once called George W. Bush “the devil,” said on Monday he hoped to be able to work more closely with President Barack Obama.

The leftist 55-year-old leader added in an interview in Italy that despite the global economic crisis and signs of a slowdown in growth in Venezuela, he did not expect his country to fall into recession.

Chavez was in Venice for the world premiere of “South of the Border,” director Oliver Stone’s sympathetic portrait of a leader he says has championed the poor and who has been unfairly demonized by the U.S. media.

“I have no reason to call him (Obama) the devil, and I hope that I am right,” Chavez told reporters in Venice.

“With Obama we can talk, we are almost from the same generation, one can’t deny that Obama is different (from Bush). He’s intelligent, he has good intentions and we have to help him.”

Stone’s documentary argues that the economy has grown under Chavez’s rule and poverty levels have fallen sharply, all without the help of bailout loans from foreign lenders…..

….”We have taken some steps but unemployment continues to fall and production continues to rise. Venezuela has been affected by the crisis but has not and will not go into recession,” added the president, who sat next to Stone.

“REAL DEMOCRATIC MODEL”

Chavez also said his democratic credentials remained intact despite concerns over moves to crack down on the independent media and political opposition.

Thousands of people took to the streets of Caracas over the weekend to voice their opposition to the president, who has been in power for a decade and says he needs another 10 years to pursue his socialist reforms.

“In Venezuela, no television channel has been closed despite the fact that in many cases the television channels supported a coup d’etat,” he said…….

Full story at: http://www.reuters.com/article/newsOne/idUSTRE5864ME20090907

Oh wait, and then there is Story #3

Venezuela continues shutdown of radio stations to help “democratizing” media ownership. (See last weeks post on Mark Lloyd, FCC Diversity Officer) 

CARACAS, Sept 5 (Reuters) – Venezuela will pull the plug on 29 more radio stations, a top official in President Hugo Chavez’s government said on Saturday, just weeks after dozens of other outlets were closed in a media clampdown.

Infrastructure Minister Diosdado Cabello closed 34 radio stations in July, saying the government was “democratizing” media ownership. Critics say the move limits freedom of expression and has taken critical voices off the airwaves.

The powerful Chavez ally has threatened to close over 100 stations in total, part of a long-term campaign against private media that the government says are biased against Chavez’s government.

“Another 29 will be gone before long,” he told thousands of Chavez supporters at a political rally, without giving details which stations would be closed or when.

Cabello also said he was launching a new legal case against Globovision, the country’s most prominent anti-government television network, accusing it of inciting a coup against Chavez.

Text messages circulated Last week in Venezuela saying a coup against Chavez was imminent. Other messages circulated among Chavez supporters calling for them to be on the alert.

The government quashed the rumors quickly and said all military units were acting normally.

“They (Globovision) aired a tape supposedly with telephone messages calling for a coup d’etat,” said Cabello, a member of Chavez’s inner circle who took part in the president’s first bid for office — a violent and abortive coup in 1992.

Chavez was himself ousted for 48 hours 10 years later in a short-lived army rebellion after he won office democratically. That putsch had the support of some of the country’s television companies.

In 2007, Chavez took revenge, refusing to renew the concession of Venezuela’s oldest and most widely watched private station, RCTV, which is now visible only on cable.

Chavez has long threatened to close down Globovision on similar grounds and the government has slapped it with big fines and legal cases this year.

Story #4  Who can forget Michael Moore? 

By Colleen Barry (AP)

VENICE, Italy — Michael Moore’s says his film “Capitalism: A Love Story” is dedicated to “good people … who’ve had their lives ruined” by the quest for profit.

After many a successful debut at Cannes, Moore premieres the film Sunday in his first appearance at the Venice Film Festival. The movie won was warmly received at a press showing Saturday evening and won positive reviews. Variety called it one of Moore’s “best pics.”

“I am personally affected by good people who struggle, who work hard and who’ve had their lives ruined by decisions that are made by people who do not have their best interest at heart, but who have the best interest of the bottom line, of the company, at heart,” Moore told reporters Sunday.

The film features plenty of examples of lives shattered by corporate greed — but also some inspiring tales of workers who have rebelled.

According to Moore, “the revolt you think I am calling for has actually begun. It began Nov. 4,” when President Barack Obama was elected.

There are the Chicago glass and window company whose employees barricaded themselves to demand their pay after management laid off all 250 employees when the bank line of credit dried up.

On the side of greed, Moore tells the story of a privately run Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania-based juvenile detention center that paid off judges to lock up juvenile offenders. One boy said he had done little more than throw a piece of meat at his mother’s boyfriend during a fight at the dinner table and a teenage girl’s offense was making fun of her school’s vice principal on a Myspace page.

The film is filled with classic Moore gimmicks, like wrapping crime scene tape around landmark banks and Wall Street institutions. And there is the expected Moore grandstanding as he tries to make citizens arrests of bank CEOs, not getting past the sometimes amused security guards at the main entrance. By now, everyone sees him coming and knows who he is.

Moore said he considered himself a proxy for the “millions of Americans who would like to be placing crime scene tape around Wall Street.”

The filmmaker is optimistic that unimagined change can happen, citing the unexpected fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, and Nelson Mandela’s election as the president of South Africa after 27 years in prison for his anti-apartheid activism.

“There are many things that have happened in the last 20 years that are just utterly surprising, so that I now believe anything can happen. People can revolt in good ways.”

Moore said his expose on the health care system, “Sicko,” helped trigger “a national debate about why we are the only Western industrialized country that does not have universal health care.”

While “Capitalism” has a strong political message, Moore’s said his main purpose is to entertain with a film that “makes you laugh a little, or cry, or think. I am happy with all those results.”

But he acknowledges that his mass appeal allows him to reach even nonbelievers, a luxury enjoyed by few on the left.

“I am going to use that position to try to communicate not just to the church of the left but to the average, everyday American who wants to go see a good movie, and maybe gets something out of it at the same time.”

“Capitalism: A Love Story” is competing for the Golden Lion, which will be awarded Sept. 12. 

Moore acknowledges the revolt he is calling for has already begun with Obama’s election. Be afraid, be very afraid…… If they get their way this will not be your father’s American any more!

 Story #5   Serving the President? I thought he was supposed to serve us!

 Watch the video below, sure they have noble goals on how they can serve, but who and why are they serving? ………..

Progressive Socialists are coming out of the woodwork! They want to “Fundamentally transform” your country…. Is this what you want? If not, you must act now! We are being overwhelmed from all directions. We must stand up and fight back for the heart and soul of America! Find your voice.

 Restore the Republic, Reject the Progressive Left’s Socialist Agenda!